Types of Benefits

Chicago Social Security Disability Benefits

If You Are Unable To Work, a Disability Program May Provide You With Benefits

When you can’t work due to your physical or mental condition, Social Security may pay you disability benefits. There are several programs you may qualify for based on your medical condition(s), age and work history.

Here’s a breakdown of the programs offered by the Social Security Administration (SSA).

Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI)

The SSA pays Social Security Disability Insurance benefits if your physical or mental condition is expected to keep you from working for at least one full year. It is not a need-based program.

There are a variety of medical conditions that qualify for disability benefits. But anything that will prevent you from working may qualify. Not uncommonly, it is a combination of medical conditions.

But just because you can’t work the job you’re used to working, it doesn’t mean that you can’t work another job. SSA has many complicated rules about this.

Applying for benefits is the first step in the process, but the majority of applicants are denied. If you’re denied, you can appeal. But it isn’t easy. Whether you are just applying or you have been denied, you will want to get help from an experienced local attorney.

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) for Adults

SSI is a need-based disability program that is dependent on your income and assets. You don’t have to have the particular work history that SSDI requires. Serious, chronic medical conditions often have prevented people from gaining the right “quarters” of insurance coverage.

To meet the SSA’s asset requirements, you must have less than $2,000 (or $3,000 for a couple). In 2017, the monthly amount you’ll receive if you’re on SSI is $735 (or $1,103 for a couple). And if you’re eligible for SSI, you most likely will qualify for Medicaid and food stamps, too. To find out if you’re eligible for SSI, you must file an application. At Nash Disability Law, we can help you with the application process. Give us a call if you need to apply.

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) for Children

Children may qualify for SSI benefits if they meet both the financial and medical requirements outlined by the SSA.

The requirements can be met if you’re a single parent and earn less than $36,000 or you’re in a two-parent household that earned less than $44,000. The financial requirements are also usually met if your family is receiving government assistance such as food stamps or Medicaid.

To qualify as a disabled adult child, the Social Security Administration has fairly clear rules. You must be over the age of 18, you must be unmarried, your disability must have started before you turned 22, and at least one of your parents must have worked enough under SSA and also be either retired, deceased or receive Social Security disability.

Disability Benefits for Disabled Adult Children (DAC)

To qualify as a disabled adult child, the Social Security Administration has fairly clear rules. You must be over the age of 18, you must be unmarried, your disability must have started before you turned 22, and at least one of your parents must have worked enough under SSA and also be either retired, deceased or receive Social Security disability.

As a disabled adult child, you probably haven’t paid enough into the disability system to qualify for benefits on your own. Because of this, the SSA will use a parent’s history of work under SSA as your qualification for disability benefits.

Qualifying as a disabled adult child can be a confusing and complicated process; get help from a local Chicago-area attorney before you apply. Or, if you were denied, call a disability attorney right away.

Whether you need to apply or appeal, let the Chicago area attorneys at Nash Disability Law help you with your claim. Contact us now for a FREE consultation.